英语复习

1 A

1 In the fall of our final year, our mood changed. The relaxed atmosphere of the preceding summer semester, the impromptu ball games, the boating on the Charles River, the late-night parties had disappeared, and we all started to get our heads down, studying late, and attendance at classes rose steeply again. We all sensed we were coming to the end of our stay here, that we would never get a chance like this again, and we became determined not to waste it. Most important of course were the final exams in April and May in the following year. No one wanted the humiliation of finishing last in class, so the peer group pressure to work hard was strong. Libraries which were once empty after five o’clock in the afternoon were standing room only until the early hours of the morning, and guys wore the bags under their eyes and their pale, sleepy faces with pride, like medals proving their diligence.
大学最后一年的秋天,我们的心情变了。刚刚过去的夏季学期的轻松氛围、即兴球赛、查尔斯河上的泛舟以及深夜晚会都不见了踪影,我们开始埋头学习,苦读到深夜,课堂出勤率再次急剧上升。我们都觉得在校时间不多了,以后再也不会有这样的学习机会了,所以都下定决心不再虚度光阴。当然,下一年四五月份的期末考试最为重要。我们谁都不想考全班倒数第一,那也太丢人了,因此同学们之间的竞争压力特别大。以前每天下午五点以后,图书馆就空无一人了,现在却要等到 天快亮时才会有空座,大家熬夜熬出了眼袋,脸色苍白,睡眼惺忪,却很自豪,好像这些都是表彰他们勤奋好学的奖章。

2 But there was something else. At the back of everyone’s mind was what we would do next, when we left university in a few months’ time. It wasn’t always the high-flyers with the top grades who knew what they were going to do. Quite often it was the quieter, less impressive students who had the next stages of their life mapped out. One had landed a job in his brother’s advertising firm in Madison Avenue, another had got a script under provisional acceptance in Hollywood. The most ambitious student among us was going to work as a party activist at a local level. We all saw him ending up in Congress one day. But most people were either looking to continue their studies, or to make a living with a white-collar job in a bank, local government, or anything which would pay them enough to have a comfortable time in their early twenties, and then settle down with a family, a mortgage and some hope of promotion.
还有别的事情让大家心情焦虑。每个人都在心里盘算着过几个月毕业离校之后该找份什么样的工作。并不总是那些心怀抱负、成绩拔尖的高材生才清楚自己将来要做什么,常常是那些平日里默默无闻的同学早早为自己人生的下几个阶段做好了规划。有位同学在位于麦迪逊大道他哥哥的广告公司得到了一份工作,另一位同学写的电影脚本已经与好莱坞草签了合约。我们当中野心最大的一位同学准备到地方上当一个政党活动家,我们都预料他最终会当上国会议员。但大多数同学不是准备继续深造,就是想在银行、地方政府或其他单位当个白领,薪水足够多,让他们得以在二十出头的时候过上舒适的生活,然后就娶妻生子,贷款买房,期望升职,过安稳日子。

3 I went home at Thanksgiving, and inevitably, my brothers and sisters kept asking me what I was planning to do. I didn’t know what to say. Actually, I did know what to say, but I thought they’d probably criticize me, so I told them what everyone else was thinking of doing.
感恩节的时候我回了一趟家,兄弟姐妹们免不了不停地问我毕业后有什么打算,我不知道该说什么。实际上,我知道该说什么,但我怕他们批评我,所以只对他们说了别人都准备干什么。

4 My father was watching me but saying nothing. Late in the evening, he invited me to his study. We sat down and he poured us a drink.
父亲看着我,什么也没说。夜深时,他叫我去他的书房。我们坐了下来,他给我们俩各倒了杯饮料。

5 “So?” he said.
“怎么样?”他问。

6 “Er … so what?”
“啊,什么怎么样?”

7 “So what do you really want to do?” he asked.
“你毕业后到底想做什么?”他问道。

8 My father was a lawyer, and I had always assumed he wanted me to go to law school, and follow his path through life. So I hesitated.
父亲是一名律师,我一直都认为他想让我去法学院深造,追随他的人生足迹,所以我有点儿犹豫。

9 Then I replied, “I want to travel, and I want to be a writer.”
过了会儿我回答说:“我想旅行,我想当个作家。”

10 This was not the answer I thought he would expect. Travel? Where? A writer? About what? I braced myself for some resistance to the idea.
我想这不是他所期待的答案。旅行?去哪儿旅行?当作家?写什么呀?我做好了遭到他反对的心理准备。

11 There was a long silence.
接着是一段长长的沉默。

12 “Interesting idea,” he said finally.
“这想法有点意思,”他最后说。

13 There was another long silence.
接着又是一段长长的沉默。

14 “I kind of wish I’d done that when I was your age.”
“我有点希望自己在你这个年纪时能做这些事儿。”

15 I waited.
我在等他把话说完。

16 “You have plenty of time. You don’t need to go into a career which pays well just at the moment. You need to find out what you really enjoy now, because if you don’t, you won’t be successful later.”
“你还有很多时间,不必急于进入一个暂时报酬高的行业。你现在要搞清楚自己真正喜欢什么,如果你弄不清楚,以后就不可能成功。”

17 “So how do I do this?”
“那我该怎么办?”

18 He thought for a moment. Then he said, “Look, it’s late. Let’s take the boat out tomorrow morning, just you and me. Maybe we can catch some crabs for dinner, and we can talk more.”
他想了一会儿。然后他说道:“瞧,现在太晚了。我们明天早晨乘船出海去,就我们两个。也许我们能抓点螃蟹当晚餐,我们还可以再谈谈。”

19 It was a small motorboat, moored ten minutes away, and my father had owned it for years. Early next morning we set off along the estuary. We didn’t talk much, but enjoyed the sound of the seagulls and the sight of the estuary coastline and the sea beyond.
那是一艘小小的机动船,停泊在离我们家约十分钟路程的地方,是好些年前父亲买的。次日清晨,我们沿着港湾出发,一路上没说多少话,只是默默地欣赏着海鸥的叫声,还有港湾沿岸和远处大海的景色。

20 There was no surf on the coastal waters at that time of day, so it was a smooth half-hour ride until my father switched off the motor. “Let’s see if we get lucky,” he said, picked up a rusty mesh basket with a rope attached and threw it into the sea.
在这个时候沿海水域没什么风浪,船平稳地航行了半个小时之后父亲把船停了下来。他说:“咱们在这儿试试运气吧,”然后抓起一个系上绳子的生了锈的网状篓子抛到海里。

21 We waited a while, then my father stood up and said, “Give me a hand with this,” and we hauled up the crab cage onto the deck.
我们等了一会儿,父亲站起来对我说:“来帮我一把。”于是我们一起将蟹篓子拽上了甲板。

22 Crabs fascinated me. They were so easy to catch. It wasn’t just that they crawled into such an obvious trap, through a small hole in the lid of the basket, but it seemed as if they couldn’t be bothered to crawl out again even when you took the lid off. They just sat there, waving their claws at you.
螃蟹吸引了我,它们太容易抓了。不仅仅是因为它们顺着篓盖上的小孔爬进一个再明显不过的陷阱,更因为即便盖子打开了,它们似乎也懒得从里面爬出来,只会趴在那儿冲你挥动着蟹钳。

23 The cage was brimming with dozens of soft shell crabs, piled high on top of each other. “Why don’t they try to escape?” I wondered aloud to my father.
篓子里挤满了几十只软壳螃蟹,一只压着一只,堆得老高。“它们为什么不逃走啊?”我满腹狐疑地问父亲。

24 “Just watch them for a moment. Look at that one, there! He’s trying to climb out, but every time the other crabs pull him back in,” said my father.
“你先观察一下,看那只螃蟹,那儿!它想爬出去,但每次都被同伴拽了回去,”父亲说。

25 And we watched. The crab climbed up the mesh towards the lid, and sure enough, just as it reached the top, one of its fellow crabs reached out, clamped its claw onto any available leg, and pulled it back. Several times the crab tried to defy his fellow captives, without luck.
我们接着观察。那只螃蟹顺着网眼向顶盖攀援,每当它爬到顶盖时,果然就会有另一只螃蟹举起蟹钳夹住它能够着的腿把这只螃蟹拽下来。这只螃蟹尝试了好几次想挣脱它的狱中同伴,但都没能成功。

26 “Now watch!” said my father. “He’s starting to get bored with this game.”
“快看!”父亲说。“它开始对这种游戏感到不耐烦了。”

27 Not only did the crab give up its lengthy struggle to escape, but it actually began to help stop other crabs trying to escape. He’d finally chosen an easy way of life.
这只螃蟹不仅放弃了漫长的逃亡之战,而且还帮着把其他想逃跑的螃蟹拽下来。它最终选择了一种轻松的活法。

28 Suddenly I understood why my father had suggested catching crabs that morning. He looked at me. “Don’t get pulled back by the others,” he said. “Spend some time figuring out who you are and what you want in life. Look back at the classes you’re taking, and think about which ones were most productive for you personally. Then think about what’s really important to you, what really interests you, what skills you have. Try to figure out where you want to live, where you want to go, what you want to earn, how you want to work. And if you can’t answer these questions now, then take some time to find out. Because if you don’t, you’ll never be happy.”
我忽然明白了父亲为什么提议早上来抓螃蟹。他看着我说:“你可别被别人拽下来。花点时间想想你是哪一类人,你这一生希望得到什么,回顾一下你在大学修的课程,想想有哪些课对你个人来说最有益。然后再想想什么对你最重要,什么最使你感兴趣,你有什么技能。琢磨一下你想在哪里生活,你想去哪里,想挣多少钱,想做什么样的工作。如果你现在不能回答这些问题,你就得花点时间去找出答案。你不这样做的话,永远都不会幸福的。”

29 He paused.
他停顿了一下。

30 “So you want to travel?” he asked.
“你想去旅行?”他接着问我。

31 “Yes,” I replied.
“对,”我回答说。

32 “Better get you a passport. And you want to be a writer?”
“那就去申请护照吧。你想当作家?”

33 “I think so.”
“对。

34 “Interesting choice. We’ve never had a writer in the family,” he said.
“有趣的选择,我们家还没出过作家呢,”他说。

35 My father started the motor and we set off back home.
父亲发动了马达,我们返航回家。

3 A

1 We all listen to music according to our separate capacities. But, for the sake of analysis, the whole listening process may become clearer if we break it up into its component parts, so to speak. In a certain sense we all listen to music on three separate planes. For lack of a better terminology, one might name these: (1) the sensuous plane, (2) the expressive plane, (3) the sheerly musical plane. The only advantage to be gained from mechanically splitting up the listening process into these hypothetical planes is the clearer view to be had of the way in which we listen.
我们都按照各自不同的能力来听音乐。但为了便于分析,如果把听的整个过程分成几个组成部分,那么这个过程会更清晰一些。从某种意义上来说,我们听音乐有三个不同的层次。由于缺乏更好的术语,我们姑且把它们命名为:(1)感官层次;(2)表现层次;(3)纯音乐层次。把听的过程机械地分割为以上三个假想的层次,唯一的好处是让我们更清楚地了解自己是怎样听音乐的。

2 The simplest way of listening to music is to listen for the sheer pleasure of the musical sound itself. That is the sensuous plane. It is the plane on which we hear music without thinking, without considering it in any way. One turns on the radio while doing something else and absent-mindedly bathes in the sound. A kind of brainless but attractive state of mind is engendered by the mere sound appeal of the music.
听音乐最简单的方式是去获取乐声带来的纯粹的愉悦感,这是音乐的感官层次。在这个层次上,我们只是听音乐,不做任何思考。我们打开收音机,一边做着其他的事情,一边心不在焉地沉浸在音乐中。乐声本身的魅力带我们进入一种无需思考的美妙心境。

3 The surprising thing is that many people who consider themselves qualified music lovers abuse that plane in listening. They go to concerts in order to lose themselves. They use music as a consolation or an escape. They enter an ideal world where one doesn’t have to think of the realities of everyday life. Of course they aren’t thinking about the music either. Music allows them to leave it, and they go off to a place to dream, dreaming because of and apropos of the music yet never quite listening to it.
令人意外的是,许多自认为合格的音乐爱好者在听音乐时过多地使用了这一层次。他们去听音乐会是为了忘却自我。他们把音乐当成一种慰藉,一种逃避,由此他们进入了一个可以忘却日常生活的理想世界。当然,他们也没有思考音乐。音乐允许他们离开现实,到另一个地方去做梦,因为音乐而做梦,做有关音乐的梦,却从没有真正欣赏过音乐。

4 Yes, the sound appeal of music is a potent and primitive force, but you must not allow it to usurp a disproportionate share of your interest. The sensuous plane is an important one in music, a very important one, but it does not constitute the whole story.
的确,音乐的声音魅力是一种强劲的原发力量,但不能听任它主次不分地篡夺了听者的那份兴趣。感官层次是音乐的一个重要层次,非常重要,但并不是音乐的全部。

5 The second plane on which music exists is what I have called the expressive one. Here, immediately, we tread on controversial ground. Composers have a way of shying away from any discussion of music’s expressive side. Did not Stravinsky himself proclaim that his music was an “object”, a “thing”, with a life of its own, and with no other meaning than its own purely musical existence? This intransigent attitude of Stravinsky’s may be due to the fact that so many people have tried to read different meanings into so many pieces. Heaven knows it is difficult enough to say precisely what it is that a piece of music means, to say it definitely, to say it finally so that everyone is satisfied with your explanation. But that should not lead one to the other extreme of denying to music the right to be “expressive”.
音乐存在的第二个层次就是我所说的表现层次。一提到这个问题,我们马上就进入到一个颇具争议的领域。作曲家总是设法避开有关音乐表现方面的讨论。斯特拉温斯基不是曾经声称他的音乐是一个“物体”,是一件有自我生命的“东西”,除了纯音乐性的存在之外没有任何别的含意吗?斯特拉温斯基这种不妥协的态度可能源于这样的一个事实:有那么多的人尝试着从众多的音乐作品中读出完全不同的含意。确实,要准确地说出一部音乐作品的含意已经很难了,要肯定并确定地说出来,还要使每个人对你的解释都感到满意,是难上加难。但我们不该因此走到另一个极端,不能去剥夺音乐“表现”的权利。

6 Listen, if you can, to the 48 fugue themes of Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavichord. Listen to each theme, one after another. You will soon realize that each theme mirrors a different world of feeling. You will also soon realize that the more beautiful a theme seems to you the harder it is to find any word that will describe it to your complete satisfaction. Yes, you will certainly know whether it is a gay theme or a sad one. You will be able, in other words, in your own mind, to draw a frame of emotional feeling around your theme. Now study the sad one a little closer. Try to pin down the exact quality of its sadness. Is it pessimistically sad or resignedly sad; is it fatefully sad or smilingly sad?
可能的话,你不妨听听巴赫的《平均律钢琴曲集》中的48个赋格主题。依次地、一个个地听听其中的每一个主题,你很快就会意识到每个主题都反映了一个不同的情感世界,你很快也会意识到你越觉得某个主题美妙,就越难找到令你完全满意的字眼来描述它。是的,你当然知道那个主题是欢快的还是悲伤的。换句话说,你能够在脑海中勾勒出那个主题的情感框架。那么就更仔细地听一下这个悲伤的主题吧,要明确悲伤的性质。是悲观厌世的悲伤,还是无可奈何的悲伤?是时运不济的悲伤,还是强颜欢笑的悲伤?

7 Let us suppose that you are fortunate and can describe to your own satisfaction in so many words the exact meaning of your chosen theme. There is still no guarantee that anyone else will be satisfied. Nor need they be. The important thing is that each one feels for himself the specific expressive quality of a theme or, similarly, an entire piece of music. And if it is a great work of art, don’t expect it to mean exactly the same thing to you each time you return to it.
假设你很幸运,能用许多词句充分表达你对选中主题的确切理解。但这仍然无法保证其他人对你的理解都感到满意,他们也完全没有必要感到满意。重要的是,每个人能亲自感受某个主题的表现力,或以同样的方式去感受一部完整的音乐作品独特的表现力。如果是一部伟大的音乐作品,就别指望每次去听它都能给你带来相同的感受。

8 The third plane on which music exists is the sheerly musical plane. Besides the pleasurable sound of music and the expressive feeling that it gives off, music does exist in terms of the notes themselves and of their manipulation. Most listeners are not sufficiently conscious of this third plane.
音乐存在的第三个层次是纯音乐层次。除了令人愉悦的乐声及其所表现的情感之外,音乐也因其音符本身以及对音符的处理而存在。多数听众都没有充分认识到音乐的这第三个层次。

9 It is very important for all of us to become more alive to music on its sheerly musical plane. After all, an actual musical material is being used. The intelligent listener must be prepared to increase his awareness of the musical material and what happens to it. He must hear the melodies, the rhythms, the harmonies, the tone colors in a more conscious fashion. But above all he must, in order to follow the line of the composer’s thought, know something of the principles of musical form. Listening to all of these elements is listening on the sheerly musical plane.
对我们所有人来说,更加充分地认识这个纯音乐层次非常重要。毕竟乐曲使用的是实实在在的音乐材料。聪明的听众一定要做好准备,随时提升自己对音乐材料以及这些材料的使用的理解。他必须要更加有意识地倾听音乐的旋律、节奏、和弦及音色。但最重要的是,为了能够跟上作曲家的思路,他还必须了解一些音乐形式方面的知识。去听所有这些成分就是在纯音乐层次上欣赏音乐。

10 Let me repeat that I have split up mechanically the three separate planes on which we listen merely for the sake of greater clarity. Actually, we never listen on one or the other of these planes. What we do is to correlate them – listening in all three ways at the same time. It takes no mental effort, for we do it instinctively.
让我重复一遍,我仅仅是为了讲解得更清楚才把听音乐的三个层次机械地分割开来的。事实上,我们从来都不会只在其中的一个层次上听音乐。我们其实是把它们联系起来,同时在三个层次上听音乐。这并不需要付出多少脑力,因为我们是凭本能这么做的。

11 Perhaps an analogy with what happens to us when we visit the theater will make this instinctive correlation clearer. In the theater, you are aware of the actors and actresses, costumes and sets, sounds and movements. All these give one the sense that the theater is a pleasant place to be in. They constitute the sensuous plane in our theatrical reactions.
也许,用去剧院看戏时我们做了什么来作类比,能使这种本能的联系更加明白易懂。在剧院里,你能注意到男女演员、服装和布景、声音和动作。这些东西组合在一起,会让我们觉得剧院是一个令人愉悦的地方,它们构成了我们欣赏戏剧的感官层次。

12 The expressive plane in the theater would be derived from the feeling that you get from what is happening on the stage. You are moved to pity, excitement, or gaiety. It is this general feeling, generated aside from the particular words being spoken, a certain emotional something which exists on the stage, that is analogous to the expressive quality in music.
戏剧的表现层次来自于你看舞台表演时获得的感受。它激起你的怜悯、兴奋或是愉悦。正是这种笼统的感觉,除了听台词所感受到的,主要是存在于舞台上的某种情感的东西,与音乐的表现性相类似。

13 The plot and plot development is equivalent to our sheerly musical plane. The playwright creates and develops a character in just the same way that a composer creates and develops a theme. According to the degree of your awareness of the way in which the artist in either field handles his material will you become a more intelligent listener.
剧情以及剧情的发展相当于我们所说的纯音乐层次。剧作家塑造和发展戏剧人物的方式,和作曲家创造和发展主题的方式是一样的。你能否成为一个聪明的听众,取决于你对剧作家或音乐家处理艺术材料的手段的了解有多深。

14 It is easy enough to see that the theatergoer never is conscious of any of these elements separately. He is aware of them all at the same time. The same is true of music listening. We simultaneously and without thinking listen on all three planes.
显然,看戏的人从来就不会单独注意到这其中的一个元素。他是同时注意到了一切。听音乐的道理也是一样的,我们同时地、不假思索地在三个层次上倾听音乐。

5 A

1 It was snowing heavily, and although every true New Yorker looks forward to a white Christmas, the shoppers on Fifth Avenue were in a hurry, not just to track down the last-minute presents, but to escape the bitter cold and get home to their families for Christmas Eve.
雪下得很大,虽然每个真正的纽约人都盼着过一个白色的圣诞,可还在第五大道购物的人们却行色匆匆,他们不但要在最后一刻前挑选到心仪的圣诞礼物,还要避开严寒,回家和亲人们共度圣诞夜。

2 Josh Lester turned into 46th Street. He was not yet enjoying the Christmas spirit, because he was still at work, albeit a working dinner at Joanne’s. Josh was black, in his early thirties, and an agreeable-looking person, dressed smartly but not expensively. He was from a hard-working family in upstate Virginia, and was probably happiest back home in his parents’ house. But his demeanor concealed a Harvard law degree and an internship in DC with a congressman, a junior partnership in a New York law firm, along with a razor-sharp intellect and an ability to think on his feet. Josh was very smart.
乔希·莱斯特拐进了第四十六街。他还没来得及享受圣诞的气氛,因为他仍在工作,虽说只是在乔安妮餐厅吃一顿工作餐。乔希是黑人,三十出头,长得平易近人,穿着时髦得体,却不华贵。他来自弗吉尼亚州北部,父母都是辛勤工作的人,或许只有回到父母家里才最让他感到幸福。单从他的行为举止,别人看不出他拥有一个哈佛法学院的学位,一段在华盛顿特区跟从国会议员实习的经历,还有纽约一家律师事务所初级合伙人的身份。他才华横溢,思维敏捷,聪明过人。

3 The appointment meant Josh wouldn’t get home until after Christmas. He was not, however, unhappy. He was meeting Jo Rogers, the senior senator for Connecticut, and one of the bestknown faces in the US. Senator Rogers was a Democrat in her third term of office, who knew Capitol Hill inside out but who had nevertheless managed to keep her credibility with her voters as a Washington outsider. She was pro-abortion, anti-corruption, pro-low carbon emissions and anti-capital punishment, as fine a progressive liberal as you could find this side of the Atlantic. Talk show hosts called her Honest Senator Jo, and a couple of years ago, Time magazine had her in the running for Woman of the Year. It was election time in the following year, and the word was she was going to run for the Democratic nomination. Rogers had met Josh in DC, thought him highly competent, and had invited him to dinner.
这次会面意味着乔希要过了圣诞夜才能回家了。他并没有因此而不高兴,因为他要见的人是康涅狄格州的资深参议员乔·罗杰斯,此人是全美曝光率最高的名人之一。参议员罗杰斯是民主党人,现在是她的第三个任期,对于国会山的一切她了如指掌,尽管如此,她还是尽力维持住了在她的支持者心中作为一位华盛顿局外人的信誉。她支持堕胎,反对腐败,支持减少二氧化碳排量,反对死刑,可以说是大西洋岸的美国能找到的最完美的进步自由派人士。脱口秀主持人们称呼她“诚实的参议员乔”,几年前《时代周刊》提名她参加年度女性的角逐。明年就是选举年了,有消息称她将参加民主党内总统提名的竞选。罗杰斯在华盛顿见过乔希,她觉得乔希很有才干,于是就邀他共进晚餐。

4 Josh shivered as he checked the address on the slip of paper in his hand. He’d never been to Joanne’s, but knew it by reputation, not because of its food, which had often been maligned, or its jazz orchestra, which had a guest slot for a well-known movie director who played trumpet, but because of the stellar quality of its sophisticated guests: politicians, diplomats, movie actors, hall-of-fame athletes, journalists, writers, rock stars and Nobel Prize winners – in short, anyone who was anyone in this city of power brokers.
乔希打了个冷战,他打开手里的纸条核对了一下地址。之前他没来过乔安妮餐厅,但对于它的鼎鼎大名却早有耳闻,倒不是因为这里的饭菜有多美味,其实这里的菜品屡遭恶评,也不是因为这里的爵士管弦乐队有一位知名电影导演客串吹小号,而是因为这里汇集了有头有脸的宾客,可以说是星光璀璨,他们中有政客、外交家、电影明星、载入名人堂的体育明星、记者、作家、摇滚明星、诺贝尔奖得主等等——总之,这里的每一位客人都是这座权力之城里的一个不一般的人物。

5 Inside, the restaurant was heaving with people. The head waiter at the front desk looked at Josh as he came in.
餐厅里面人头攒动。乔希走进来时前台的领班看了他一眼。

6 “Can I help you?”
“您需要帮忙吗?”

7 Josh replied, ” Yes , I have an …”
乔希回答说:“是的,我有一个……”

8 “Excuse me, sir,” the head waiter interrupted as two guests arrived, “Good evening Miss Bacall, good evening Mr Hanks,” and clicked his fingers to summon another waiter to show them to their table.
“对不起,先生……”看见有两位客人走了进来,领班打断了他的话。“晚上好,巴考尔小姐,晚上好,汉克斯先生。”接着他打了个响指招呼服务生带他们入座。

9 “Now, sir …,” said the head waiter. “… do you have a reservation?” He shrugged his shoulders. “We have no spare tables whatsoever, as you can see.”
“好吧,先生,请问您预订座位了吗?”领班耸了耸肩,说道,“您也看见了,我们没有空余的座位。”

10 “I’m meeting a Ms Rogers here tonight.”
“我今天晚上要在这儿和一位名叫罗杰斯的女士会面。”

11 The head waiter looked at Josh up and down, and asked, “May I have your name?”
领班把乔希从头到脚打量了一番,然后说:“请问您怎么称呼?”

12 Josh told him, and although the waiter refrained from curling his lip, he managed to show both disdain and effortless superiority with a simple flaring of his nostrils.
乔希向他报了姓名,虽然领班好不容易才忍住没撇嘴,但他还是鼓了鼓鼻翼,显示出了他的不屑以及自然而然的优越感。

13 “Let me see,” said the head waiter. “Well, yes, we do have a table for a Ms Rogers, but will she be arriving soon?”
“让我查一下。”领班说道。“哦,对了,我们的确为一位罗杰斯女士预留了一张桌子,可是她马上就到吗?”

14 Josh had encountered this doubtful treatment before but was not intimidated.
乔希过去也有过被人怀疑的经历,但他没有被吓到。

15 “I’m sure she will,” said Josh. “Could you please show me to her table?”
“我肯定她很快就到。能烦请你带我去她的座位吗?”乔希说。

16 “Come this way, sir.” The head waiter led Josh through the restaurant to a table at the back, and pointed.
“那这边走,先生。”领班把乔希领到餐厅靠里处,指了指一张桌子。

17 “Thank you. Could you get me a Martini, please?” said Josh. But the head waiter was impatient to go back into the heady swirl of New York society, everyone clamoring, or so it appeared to him, for his attention.
“谢谢,请给我来一杯马提尼酒,”乔希说。可那位领班还没等他说完就迫不及待地要回到纽约上层社会那令人陶醉的纷乱中去,至少在他看来,那里的每一个人都在召唤着他,希望得到他的注意。

18 The table was close to the bathroom and right by a half-opened window, apparently positioned where an icy breeze from the Great Lakes, passing down the Hudson Valley, would end its journey.
这张桌子离卫生间很近,还紧挨着一扇半开的窗户,好像从五大湖刮来的刺骨寒风正好沿着哈得孙峡谷吹进来,在这儿结束了它的旅程。

19 Suddenly there was a moment’s silence in the restaurant, only for the noise to resume as intense whispering.
突然间,餐厅安静了片刻,紧接着又响起了一阵热烈的窃窃私语声。

20 “Senator Rogers!” said the head waiter. “What a great honor it is to see you at Joanne’s again!”
“罗杰斯参议员!”领班喊道,“能在乔安妮再次见到您真是太荣幸了!”

21 “Good evening, Alberto. I’m dining with a young man, name of Lester.”
“晚上好,阿尔贝托。我要和一位年轻人吃饭,他叫莱斯特。”

22 The head waiter blinked, and swallowed hard.
领班慌得直眨眼,还咽了咽口水。

23 “Yes, senator, please come this way,” and as Senator Rogers passed through the crowded room, heads turned as the diners recognized her and greeted her with silent applause. In a classless society, Rogers was the closest thing to aristocracy that America had. Alberto hovered for a moment, then went to speak to a colleague.
“好的,参议员,您这边走。”当罗杰斯参议员穿过拥挤的餐厅时,不断有人回过头来,他们认出了她,并默默地跟她打招呼。在一个不分阶级的社会里,罗杰斯近乎是美国的贵族。阿尔贝托在周围转了一阵子,然后走过去和一位同事说了几句话。

24 “It’s good to see you again, Josh,” said Rogers. “Let’s have something to eat, then I’d like to talk to you about a business proposition.”
“很高兴又见到你,乔希,”罗杰斯说。“我们先吃点东西,然后我要跟你谈谈一份商业建议书的事。”

25 Alberto returned, bent half double in almost laughable humility.
阿尔贝托回到餐桌旁,深深地弯下腰,那谦卑的样子简直有点可笑。

26 “Senator, as this table is so cold , so uncomfortable, I was wondering if …”
“参议员,这张桌子太冷了,坐着不舒服,不知道……”

27 Senator Rogers waited and then said quietly, “Go on.”
罗杰斯参议员等着,然后轻声地说道:“接着说。”

28 “I was wondering if you’d like a better table, in the middle of the restaurant, so you have a better view of everyone.” So everyone has a better view of you, he might have said. “You’ll be much more comfortable, and …”
“不知道您愿不愿意换张好点儿的桌子,到餐厅中央去,这样您就能看到餐厅里的每一个人了。”这样餐厅里的每一个人都可以看见您啦,他本是想这么说的。“那样您会觉得舒服得多,而且……”

29 Alberto paused. Senator Rogers looked around.
阿尔贝托停了下来。罗杰斯参议员看了看四周。

30 “I agree, this isn’t the best table in the house. But you brought my friend here, and I guess this is where we’ll stay. We’ll have my usual, please.”
“我同意,这儿不是屋子里最好的座位,但既然你把我的朋友带到了这儿,我想我们就呆在这里好了,上我平时点的菜吧。”

31 After two hours, Rogers and Josh got up to leave. There was a further flurry of attention by the staff, including an offer by Alberto to waive payment of the bill, which Rogers refused. As they were putting on their coats, Rogers said, “Thank you, Alberto. Oh, have I introduced you to my companion, Josh Lester?”
两个小时后,罗杰斯和乔希起身准备离开,这又引起店员们的一阵骚动,个个都主动来献殷勤,其中就包括阿尔贝托,他提出来要给他俩免单,但被罗杰斯拒绝了。他俩披上外套,罗杰斯说:“阿尔贝托,谢谢你。噢,我给你介绍我的同事乔希·莱斯特了吗?”

32 A look of panic, followed by one of desperate optimism flashed across Alberto’s face.
阿尔贝托的脸上先是一阵惊恐,然后又闪过绝望中的一丝企盼。

33 “Ah, not yet, no, … not properly,” he said weakly.
“啊,还没有,不……还没正式介绍过。”他低声下气地说。

34 “Josh Lester. This is the latest recruit to my election campaign. He’s going to be my new deputy campaign manager, in charge of raising donations. And if we get that Republican out of the White House next year, you’ve just met my Chief of Staff.”
“乔希·莱斯特。他是我刚刚招收的竞选班子成员。他马上就要成为我竞选团队的副经理了,将负责募集捐款。如果明年我们把那位共和党人赶出白宫的话,你现在看到的就是我的白宫办公厅主任。”

35 “Absolutely delighted to meet you, Mr Lester, a real privilege, I’m sure. I do hope we’ll see you both again in Joanne’s very soon,” said Alberto.
“非常高兴见到您,莱斯特先生,非常荣幸,真的。我衷心希望很快能在乔安妮餐厅再次见到二位。”

36 The Senator looked at Alberto.
参议员看了看阿尔贝托。

37 “No, I don’t think that’s at all likely,” replied Senator Rogers.
“不会了,我觉得没有这种可能了。”罗杰斯参议员回答道。

38 Rogers and Josh stepped out together into the cold night air. It had stopped snowing.
罗杰斯和乔希一起走进寒风凛冽的夜色中。雪已经停了。

5 B

1 It’s that time of the year when the world seems to be caught in a trance – the trance of end-of-year celebrations. End-of-year, I said.
每年的这个时候,整个世界仿佛都陷入了一种迷狂——人们狂热地进行着岁末的庆祝活动。我说的是岁末。

2 The problem seems to be exactly that. Why should we in China refer to the week between December 24 and 31 as the end of the year when ours (according to the lunar calendar) is at least a month away?
问题就出在这儿。为什么我们中国人要把12月24日到31日这一周作为岁末来庆祝,而我们自己的岁末(按照阴历)至少还有一个月才到呢?

3 We do so apparently because Christmas and New Year have become global festivals, not because they (especially Christmas) are essentially Western in nature and spirit, but because we can relax during those few days.
我们这么做,显然是因为圣诞节和元旦已经成了全球性的节日,并不是因为它们(尤其是圣诞节)在本质上和精神上主要代表了西方文化,而是因为在这几天里我们能好好放松一下。

4 Nevertheless, some scholars and students have expressed concern over the increasing influence of Christmas on oriental, particularly Chinese, culture. Their fears may be justified to a certain extent. In fact, we Chinese do seem to attach a lot more time and attention to Christmas today than we did even a couple of decades ago.
但是,圣诞节对于东方文化,尤其是中国文化的影响与日俱增,对此,一些学者和学生表示担忧。从某种程度上讲,他们的忧虑是有道理的。的确,与几十年前相比,现在中国人花在圣诞节上的时间和精力似乎要多很多。

5 For good or bad, the world has possibly undergone more changes in the past two decades than it did in the past two centuries. We have used more resources, burnt more fuel, caused more pollution and killed off more animals and plants as we have come closer to each other to form a truly global village. Television, we thought, was the last uniting factor till we got a feel for the Internet.
不管是好是坏,世界在过去二十多年间所经历的变化可能比过去两百年间所经历的还要多。为了让彼此间联系得更紧密,营造出一个真正的地球村,我们消耗了更多的资源,烧掉了更多的能源,造成了更多的污染,灭杀了更多的动植物。过去,我们一直把电视看作是连接全世界的终极手段,直到我们了解了互联网,才发现事实并非如此。

6 All these changes have made us take a different look at the world beyond and our home within. Nothing comes without a rider in this global market. If we want to be part of the dazzle and comfort that the West is known for, we had better accept some of its anomalies, too. This is not to say that festivals mean something else to the West.
所有这些变化都让我们用另外一种眼光来看待外面的世界以及我们自己的家园。在这个全球市场中,得到任何东西都是要付出代价的。如果我们想拥有众所闻知的西方世界的眩目而舒适的生活,我们也必须接受西方文化中的一些异常事物。这并不是说节日对于西方人来说有着不同的意义。

7 Be it on the mainland or in the highly developed West or in the poorest of societies, a festival carries the same meaning. People across the world celebrate them with their family and friends. The basic concept is the same too, sharing a feast or a humble meal (with a few drinks in some societies like ours and the West).
不管是在中国大陆,还是在高度发达的西方国家,抑或是世界上最贫穷的社会,节日承载着相同的意义。世界各地的人们和家人、朋友一起庆祝节日。节日的基本概念是一样的,就是大家分享一顿盛宴或是一餐便饭(在西方或是我们的国家里,人们会小酌几杯)。

8 We celebrate an occasion to vent our feelings, to relax and enjoy a break from the everyday skulduggery that life in these times has become. It’s apparently no different from the break our ancestors enjoyed from the mundane affairs of their daily lives.
我们庆祝节日,是为了释放情感,放松身心,是为了从现代生活的尔虞我诈中摆脱出来,得到片刻的安宁。显然,这和我们的祖先从日常俗事中寻求解脱是一回事儿。

9 Most of the world follows the Gregorian calendar, including us, in their day-to-day lives. So the festivals and special events in that calendar are bound to influence us. That we, like many South, Southeast Asian, Middle East and perhaps some indigenous American people, follow the lunar calendar for our festivals is a different matter altogether.
世界上多数国家在日常生活中采用格列高利历,中国也是如此。所以这个历法中的节日和特殊事件注定会影响到我们。而我们,和许多南亚、东南亚、中东,或许还有一些美国土著居民一样,根据阴历来过节,而这又完全是另外一回事儿了。

10 We cannot afford to be left untouched by the festive spirit of the West, which doesn’t mean we follow the West blindly. Not everything about their culture may be good, but decadence is not the sole preserve of the West. No culture in the world is free of decadence and that includes Chinese culture.
对于西方的节日气氛无动于衷,这我们做不到,但这也并不意味着我们要盲目跟风。西方文化不全都是好的,但同时,颓废的东西也不是西方文化所独有的。世界上没有一种文化能免于颓废,中国文化也不例外。

11 So the problem is not Western culture, or what we generally associate with it. The problem is those who are blinded by everything Western. We have to find out why more and more Chinese, especially the youngsters, feel at one with Western festivals as much as they do with the Chinese ones. But thankfully our festivals have lost none of their charm. And here is where the alarm bells sounded by scholars and students come in.
所以,问题并不在于西方文化,也不在于那些我们通常和西方文化联系在一起的东西。问题出在那些唯西方马首是瞻的人身上。为什么越来越多的中国人,尤其是中国的年轻人,对于西方节日和中国节日一样怡然自得,我们应该找出其中的原因。好在我们自己的节日并没有失去它们的风采。 而正是因为担心这一点,我们的学者和学生们敲响了警钟。

12 I can understand the zeal of these people. They want to conserve our culture, and that definitely doesn’t make them what we generally refer to as “conservatives”. They have a point. But they, or for that matter anybody else, cannot save any society from the influence of a world getting smaller by the day.
我能够理解这些人的热情。他们想保护我们的文化,但绝不能因为这一点就认为他们是我们通常所说的保守派。他们的观点有一定的道理。但是在这件事情上,他们和其他人一样,无法使任何社会免受日益变小的世界的影响。

13 So instead of trying to shut our eyes and ears to Western festivals, we should accept the goodness they offer and practise what they stand for. And let’s not forget that Jesus was not born in the West but the East (the Middle East, to be precise), and he preached love for mankind and help for the poor.
所以,我们不应该对西方的节日视而不见、充耳不闻,相反,我们应该取其精华,去实践这些节日所倡导的德行。我们不要忘了,耶稣诞生于东方(确切地说,是中东),而不是在西方,我们也应该记住他要我们热爱全人类,扶贫助弱。

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